10 September

1753 birth of Sir John Soane

1882 birth of Jacques Gréber

BEST Product Catalog Showroom
Mortuary Chapel, Mount Sinai Cemetery     1892
1998.09.10

survey
1999.09.10 09:53

some progress, but no definites
2000.09.10     2305 2306 2307 2308 2309 2310 2311 2312 2313 2314 2315 2316 2388 2428 3228d 3899h

Re: travels in hyper-reality
2001.09.10 09:34     5005 5800c

the theme of theming
2001.09.10 09:53     5031

United Way Headquarters Building     1971
Site of the Free Library of Philadelphia expansion and site of the forthcoming Barnes Foundation Benjamin Franklin Parkway at Logan Circle
Free Library of Philadelphia at Logan Circle
Erected by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in Honor of Her Colored Soldiers
Logan Circle
The Holocaust on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Love Park
Love
John F. Kennedy Plaza
Kopernik Monument
Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul     1851
2003.09.10

What are you reading?
2003.09.10 15:28     3727c 5600l

Architecture of Decadence
2015.09.10 13:03   3312l
2015.09.10 21:19   3312l


1998.09.10


2003.09.10



1999.09.10 09:53
survey
Is the "cyberspace" of the Internet computer network a physical or non-physical place?
3. cyberspace begins with pure virtuality, i.e., the potential to be something, then becomes a "place" when people participate, and ends, after the participation, to be again pure virtuality.
4. I like cyberspace because of its otherness. The more I participate in cyberspace, the more I realize that I now inhabit two realms, the real world and the world of cyberspace. Moreover, I plainly see that the cyberspace world will never be the same as or replace the real world, nor do I wish cyberspace to be "physical" in the real world sense.
5. Cyberspace as a place completely other is its greatest attribute. Those that view or want to make cyberspace and the real world the same are really only defeating the "real" nature of cyberspace. Could it be that we as humans just can't easily deal with a parallel(?), other reality in addition to the reality we already have?

2001.09.10 09:34
Re: travels in hyper-reality
Theming aside, at base there is the 'practice' of reenactment carried out at both Odiaba and Las Vegas. The final point about Odiaba being all on an artificial island is literally the base of Odiaba that is itself a reenactment of something otherwise natural. Las Vegas too has a basis that is a man-made reenactment of something otherwise natural, namely the 'oasis' spawned by Hoover Dam. While Learning From Las Vegas indeed recognizes the 'oasis' aspect within the 1960s hotel complexes, it does not recognize the overall oasis reenactment of Las Vegas as a whole. Along with all the 'caravans' that converge upon Las Vegas seeking 'pleasure' and 'comfort' in the desert, it is more the hydroelectric well spring of Las Vegas (via Hoover Dam) that engenders the entire cities life-givingness. In this sense, the animated electric signs along the strip (and now also within Fremont Street's electronic vault) are all at base hydroelectric reenactments of fountains splashing away.
My favorite reenactment place/city lately is Atlantic City, New Jersey, a true latter-day Las Vegas on the sea-coast, essentially a reenactment of a reenactment of a reenactment all right on the edge of a continent.
All the same, I believe it is safe to say that Las Vegas is the reenactment capital of modern times. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if one of the next waves of new casino construction comes to reenact Las Vegas of the 1960s, or, if I were ever the 'planning commissioner' of Las Vegas, I'd begin efforts to construct colossal wave pools all around Las Vegas so as to reenact Atlantic City. Reenactment is hyper-reality for sure.

2001.09.10 09:53
the theme of theming
Is it not safe to say that the over-riding theme of theming is reenactment?

2003.09.10 15:28
What are you reading?
Lost in the Archives
"There is a crisis in the archives. Contemporary protocols for archiving and accessing increasingly vast amounts of materials present unprecedented possibilities and problems for the production, classification, and use of knowledge. Surveying the jagged edge between memory and forgetting, revealing the force and scope of some of memory's losses--its technical drop-outs, its lacunae, burials, omissions, eclipses, and denials--Lost in the Archives explores the thesis that memory is productively read from its failures and absences, in the not-yet or impossible archives, in archive fevers and dementias, in all the places archives cannot or have not looked. Investigations on the limits of memory are instigated by over 70 artists and writers, including Jacques Derrida, Atom Egoyan, Gustave Flaubert, Boris Groys, Candida Höfer, Rem Koolhaas, Sol Lewitt, Bruce Mau, and Jeff Wall. Like a purloined letter, the shelved and forgotten book wields its most virulent power precisely in being unread. Unread, if not indeed illegible, what is lost in the archive may prove to exert the most shocking force."

12091001 Working Title Museum 001 plan model (IQ register)
12091001 Working Title Museum 002 plan model (IQ register)
12091001 Working Title Museum 003 plan model (IQ register)
12091001 Working Title Museum 004 plan model (IQ register)


13091001 Olivetti Headquarters Milton Keynes plan
13091002 novel architecturale plans at the same scale   206gc


14091001 Temple of Posideon plan elevation image attached with column model Museum of Architecture plan etc.
14091002 Acropolis plan image attached with Museum of Architecture plan etc.



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