4 November

1739 Georg Raphael Donner completed the great fountain in the Neue Markt (formerly Mehlmarkt) at Vienna

1935 birth of Manfredo Tafuri

seeking precedents... ...finding inspiration (2nd version)
1998.11.04

Eastern State Penitentiary     1836
Founder's Hall
Northern Savings Fund Society Building     1872
Guild House     1966
Columbia Avenue Station Improvements     1984a
William Penn High School     1975
Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute     1956
1998.11.04

Re: sketching
2001.11.14 11:23     2070

Re: The Disney on PBS >> the ABC of politics
2003.11.14 13:09     3728g

The Language of Architecture
2012.11.04 11:42     3155e 3732c 3749v 4402g 4500r

Why won't you design what we (the public) want?
2013.11.04 17:18     4500t
2013.11.04 19:29     3155h 3732d 3771i 3800d 4500t 4600n
2013.11.04 21:22     4500t

"Architectural Debates Are Rubbish"
2015.11.04 10:13     3313c

Donald Draper at the Museum...
2016.11.04 19:06     3314u


07110402



07110401 Maison Millennium? perspectives
07110402 Maison Millennium?? axonometics perspectives

2012.11.04 11:42
The Language of Architecture
For the most part, spoken languages still relate to quite specific geographic locations. Up until roughly 100 years ago, specific geographic locations, too, had their distinct architectures. Colonialism began to usurp 'native' architectures with European architectures. In the mid-20th century the 'International Style' became an architectural Esperanto.
Is architecture today composed mostly of many, many personal languages?
Otherwise:
Are most of architecture's languages now lost?
What present architectures still relate to specific geographic locations?
What architectures are bilingual?
What architectures are multilingual?
What architectures exist also in translation?
What architectures now exist only in translation ?
What architectures are lost in translation?
Who speaks slang architecture? And is slang architecture ever appropriate?
Does anyone ever order language-salad architecture? Maybe that tastes best on Pentecost.
"I love my architect[ure]s because they often manage to say something I haven't heard before."

2013.11.04 17:18
Why won't you design what we (the public) want?
Just to interject regarding Schinkel, the wikipedia entry is misleading. The Crown Prince was about seventeen years old when Schinkel began designs for the Altes Museum, and it was about that time that Schinkel began giving lessons to the Crown Prince in drawing and design. Thus, the notion of 'influence' definitely goes both ways. Also, I've seen reproductions of several of the Crown Prince's architectural sketches, and I don't recall seeing one of the Altes Museum, although that doesn't mean one such sketch does not exist. Moreover, for the real influence on the design of the Altes Museum, look to Durand.
...be careful when writing Gropius and Schinkel in the same sentence. Schinkel was a student of architect Martin Gropius, and I think Schinkel even lived within the Martin Gropius household as a student.

2013.11.04 19:29
Why won't you design what we (the public) want?
Was just inspired to write a 'historical' novel where Schinkel uses the 'influence' of the Crown Prince to get to do the designs he, Schinkel, wants. The Crown Prince figures out Schinkel's stratagem and thus starts changing his mind like every week or so as to what style a project should be designed in, just to drive Schinkel a little crazy, but also to see just how clever Schinkel can be. Schinkel, in turn, figures out the Crown Prince's stratagem and hence the architecture just starts getting more and more weird. [Wolfhilde von Schlittenfahrt, the sexy, new intern in Schinkel's office quickly becomes aware of the dueling stratagems and immediately starts 'busting' in her own stratagems.] Add to that that both Schinkel and the Crown Prince are obsessed with the life and works of Heinrick von Kleist and participate in a secret Von Kleist Society where all forms of strangeness ensue. Working title: Kohlhaas wo bist du?

2013.11.04 21:22
Why won't you design what we (the public) want?
During the reign of (emperor) Augustus, there came a delegation from India to Rome. Augustus was busy building Rome into a "stone" city at the time. The design of tomb of Augustus is uncannily similar (even very similar in size) to the Great Stupa in India. I think the delegation brought along drawings to show where they came from. I guess you really wouldn't be an emperor if, after seeing someone else's great thing, you didn't immediately think, "I want one of them too."


15110401   Section House working model   2448i06   b   c   d   e   f



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