5 December

1639 death of Sir Henry Wotton

1832 birth of Charles Yriarte
1857 death of Christian Daniel Rauch
1862 death of Augustin Nicolas Caristie

assimilating architecture?
1998.12.05 11:30     3749 4401b 4402b 4403c 4706

virtual Gerusalemme
2001.12.05 20:03     2070 3728e 5035

The Greatest Thesis Titles EVER!
2005.12.05 11:38     3899b

Thom Mayne on Charlie Rose
2005.12.05 13:22     4000d
2005.12.05 16:00     3749i 3770l

where's the avant garde?
2009.12.05 12:42     3749s 3771b 4600j

How can architects help the Gaza strip people?
2012.12.05 10:40     4402h

5 December
2013.12.05 21:33     3306f mp6606x

"Are we human?" Curators Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley announce concept for 2016 Istanbul Design Biennial
2015.12.05 16:59     3313g
2015.12.05 20:14     3313h 3727i
2015.12.05 23:19     3313h


Horace Trumbauer, Whitemarsh Hall (Wyndmoor, PA: under construction, 1917.12.05)





1998.12.05 11:30
assimilating architecture?
Since c.1500, humanity (however, mostly Western/European culture) has operated predominantly under the influence of an assimilating imagination--a process whereby everything about this planet, and even beyond, has been and still is run through the workings of absorption -- absorption of land, data, capital, whole societies, etc. (Science in general is a very assimilating process, and genocide is just one example of absorption in the extreme--purge.)
According to chronosomatics, a theory based on the interrelationship of time and the human body, there are roughly 200 years left where assimilation will play a major role with regard to the human imagination, and, more importantly, the next 200 years of assimilation will also be the largest and grossest "chunks" of assimilation yet, perhaps culminating with the total and complete knowledge of every bit of rhyme, reason, cause and effect of the human genome. Chronosomatics also shows us that metabolism (equal doses of creation and destruction) has been steadily becoming the new and eventually predominate operation of the human imagination. Therefore there is a strong pluralism within the operation of the human imagination today as well.
Are there thus some things within the last 500 years architectural history that relate to the notion of an assimilating architecture? Is there something about the present state of architectural affairs that points to an assimilating and/or metabolic architecture? For example, is the high eclecticism of the late 19th century one form of assimilating architecture? Is Le Corbusier's Purism akin to assimilating architecture in the extreme? Is the current widespread/global land development precisely a continuation of the assimilating process begun by the likes of Christopher Columbus? Will humanity, 200 years hence, have come extremely close to assimilating (for better or for worse) every square inch of this planet?
Personally, I think the answer is yes, but that's not the worst of it. After assimilation ceases to be a major element within the operation of the human imagination, humanity will spend 500 years working under the influence of an almost purely metabolic imagination. Imagine living on Earth when pretty much everything thought and done is create and destroy, create and destroy, create and destroy. . . . .

2005.12.05 13:22
Thom Mayne on Charlie Rose
Morphosis architecture represents architecture well, but I don't think Mayne on Rose represented architecture well at all. The times when Rose "had no idea what he (Mayne) was talking about" are when Mayne didn't honestly answer the question. For example, when Rose asked what motivates Mayne's design now, Mayne couldn't give an honest objective answer. Instead, Mayne, after some silence, gave ethereal blah-blah. Granted, it was just that type of stuff architects are used to hearing at design juries among themselves, but that does not make it a good answer.


2005.12.05 16:00
Thom Mayne on Charlie Rose
First of all, presenting a sound-bite answer is not the issue here, especially since Rose gave Mayne a whole hour. Rose's question contained some leads, "is it politics?, is it style?" (I don't remember all the exact words), and given the question, I would have given the context of where I see Morphosis within architectural history, and then explained what the Morphosis design approach sets out to accomplish. I can't answer what Mayne would say himself, but that's the way I would have approached an answer to the question. What I thought after I saw Mayne's hesitation and then heard his answer is just how afraid and subsequently unable architects are at talking about style. But, more to the point, architects are afraid to discuss their motivation because a lot of the motivation (especially for Morphosis) is about creating a certain style.
style 1 : the way in which something is said, done, expressed, or performed
The notion of style in architecture has been so debased by Modernism's reaction to eclecticism that architects now don't even know how to talk about it.

07120501 Girard Collage site plan
07120502 Girard Collage model
07120503 Girard Collage perspectives axonometrics


2009.12.05 12:42
where's the avant garde?
Get a notion or idea
that most will resist,
and chances are
that it's avant garde.

13120508 IQ08 composite plan data   2170i40


14120501 Ury House 1100x550 plan orthagonal /domestic



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